Archive for the ‘RIF’s’ Category

Why a Union?

May 9, 2011

This is a link to an article about a teacher who worked for over 40 years and recounts the many things that her union did for her.  The list is common, the telling is not.  Most of the things she speaks of are “perks” that most teachers expect in their jobs, but perhaps are unaware that union members had to be strong and committed in the fight for these rights.  It’s a great article.

http://jd2718.wordpress.com/2011/03/22/could-i-have-been-a-great-teacher-without-a-union-no-never/

Layoff and “Bumping”

May 9, 2011

Despite current rumors, “bumping” is not a part of the layoff process in the KEA/KSD contract. No one will get to select your job and push you out of it. And, although the contract groups jobs together into “categories,” the same process applies to all teachers in all categories. No group or job-type has greater rights or protections than any other.

So, how does it work, then? The district compiles a district-wide seniority list in January of each year, using all experience of a type that would be used for salary schedule placement, regardless of the district in which the experience was gained. Then, the school board decides which positions (not people) are to be reduced from the program. Next, the district looks at seniority within each broad job category in which there will be reductions, and identifies the staff with the least district-wide seniority. The least senior staff in those categories who have multiple endorsements will then be compared in seniority to staff in those other categories, again on a district-wide basis, to see if they are to be retained over less senior staff. The end result should be that more senior staff should be retained in any category in which they are certificated. If this causes them to move to a different category, then the least senior staff person in that second category may be the one to be let go.

Transfers to even out staffing then follow. Staff who are retained may need to be moved to another building. This is also done by seniority, with the least senior person in the surplus category being moved first. Unlike the regular transfer process, this “Transfer Due to Reduction of Staff” does not exempt provisional status teachers from being moved. This process is scheduled to take place in early June. A list of openings and of “surplus” teachers will be distributed in advance, then those to be moved will be called, starting with the most senior, to select from among the vacant positions in other buildings. No one may select a position that is not already scheduled to be vacant.

Admittedly, this is just a summary of the contract language. To gain a more precise understanding of the process, one should read the contract (Article VII, Section 8; page 112 ff). It can be found at the Contract tab at http://www.kentea.org. No one can accurately predict the final outcome of this process, nor can the Association accurately address each of a myriad of hypothetical scenarios. The best advice we can give you is to read the contract.

Getting ready for RIFs

May 8, 2011

With RIF (Reduction In Force) notices set to go out this week, it is critical that you know what to do, even if you do not feel you are in danger of being let go.  If you do receive one, note that there will be a meeting at the KEA office on May 17, at 4:00 to give you information on what this means and what your rights are.  This is a checklist from WEA and KEA:

Getting ready for RIFs: Six steps to take now

 With significant cuts coming in the state education budget, KEA and WEA want you to be prepared in case you receive a Reduction in Force (RIF) notice. Here are some important steps to take NOW, even if you have not received a RIFnotice:

  • Keep all notices and paperwork you receive from your employer, especially your RIF notification should you receive one. These explain your appeal rights and may be necessary for any potential challenge to a RIF.
  • Make an appointment to check your personnel file at the district office. Make sure the information in it is accurate and complete. For example, make sure that your contracted FTE, endorsements and other information are recorded properly. If you find mistakes, correct them as soon as possible. 
  • Make sure the district has current contact information for you, and keep it updated (mailing address, phone number, e-mail address, etc.). If you do not have a personal, non-district e-mail address, sign up for a free one and provide it to the district. Accurate contact information is important in case of a recall.
  • Get a complete copy of your personnel file. You may have to pay for the copy charges, but the investment will be worthwhile down the road.
  • Obtain letters of recommendation from your principal or other key people and have these recommendations ready in the event you need to look for employment elsewhere.
  • Make sure you know who your local association president and UniServ representatives are and how to get hold of them.                                                                                               (President: Lisa Brackin Johnson- lisa.brackin-johnson@washingtonea.org), UniServ Rep: Sandra Goveia- sgoveia@washingtonea.org)

Report from the KSD Budget Hearing

April 12, 2011

At the KSD Budget Hearing on March 29th, Superintendent Vargas and Business Officer Richard Stedrey reviewed the budget and proposed reductions using a worst case scenario forecast.

Audience members expressed a high level of concern regarding the budget survey process and proposed cuts, including the long-term impact of many of the cuts.  The speakers included parents, students, educators and community members. Participants raised a wide range of questions and suggested alternatives. Concerns regarding PE and Music and maintaining K-4 class size were frequently addressed. Many speakers noted the connection between Music and PE and increased academic performance. One elementary student raised $15 at a garage sale to save the PE program and a middle school student said, “Music is my life.”

Kent Education Association Vice-President Connie Compton addressed the School Board and recognized the challenges of the school district budget. She continued, “As the education professionals who work with your students every day in the classrooms across the district, we feel it is absolutely imperative that we be an integral part of the conversation. We respectfully ask the board to invite us to the table to honestly and openly discuss possible alternatives to navigate these troubled economic waters while continuing to provide a high quality and well-rounded education to each and every one of our students. Together we can find a way to reduce the budget while minimizing the impact on our students.”

Audience questions included:

  • What is the end-goal driving budget decisions?
  • What are the priorities and values of our community?
  • Have decisions already been made?
  • Why are Elementary PE and Music being considered?
  • Why do administrators earn top pay for our region, but teachers are at the bottom?
  • Why are neighboring districts able to balance their budgets without impacting classrooms?
  • Why do the Auburn and Tahoma districts have better trust with their communities?
  • Will cutting the middle In-School Suspension program limit discipline options and have unintended consequences?
  • Is PE mandated by the state?
  • Is eliminating PE a contractual issue?

Suggestions for alternative budget reductions or raising revenue:

  • Make cuts that do not impact students.
  • Reduce salary at the top.
  • Run a supplemental levy to raise $3.7 million dollars.
  • 10 summer furlough days for administrators.
  • Cut administrative travel.
  • Freeze administrative pay.
  • Eliminate outside consultants.
  • Delay new curriculum purchases.
  • Use alternative transportation for high school students.
  • Freeze standardized testing.
  • Continue tuition-based full-day kindergarten programs.

The district has responded to some of these issues on the district website. KEA looks forward to responses to the remaining questions and concerns.  As well, we hope that we will be invited to discuss options with the school board.

Budget Survey?

March 26, 2011

This was forwarded to me by Connie Compton, KEA Vice President, who wanted members to be able to see what she did when she tried to fill out the KSD Budget Survey.  This was sent to the school board and Dr. Vargas.  I apologize that the chart didn’t transfer over as well as intended.  It came as an excel doc and was difficult to format.

I just attempted to complete the Budget Survey. I am disappointed and frustrated. I am unable to make the choices that I think best serve the needs of our students because the limited choices offered force me to cut certificated staff. This survey does not allow us to keep cuts away from our students and the classroom. Because the survey gives such limited options and does not present the full list of options developed by the school district or allow me to make my own suggestions and yet requires a specific point total, I am unable to use the online tool to give my input. Therefore, I am sending my input directly to you.

The students attending school in the Kent District School District today or entering kindergarten next fall only get once chance for their education. We need to provide a well-rounded education that meets the needs of all students. Cutting the Elementary PE and Music programs does not reach this end. As a 30-year veteran special education teacher, I know that school can be challenging and even frustrating for many students. PE and Music can be the positive in their school day. Other students find their passions starting in the elementary PE and Music programs, which leads to their connection to high school, their social group, and even their college path or their careers. Research clearly ties physical health and music to academic achievement. Likewise, research supports smaller class size at the elementary level. Teachers across our district will tell you that they are already stretched to their limits. Increasing class size and cutting elementary planning time will seriously impact the learning of our students.

Ideally, I believe that a supplemental levy should be put to the voters. This would increase funding by approximately $3.7 million, which would cut the need to reduce the budget by more than half. However, it is possible to reduce the budget without directly impacting classrooms or running a supplemental levy. Please refer to the attached spreadsheet (printed below) with my recommendations to reduce expenditures.

Thank you,
Connie Compton
Elementary Special Education Teacher,
KEA Vice-President,
Community Member & Voter, and Parent of 2 KSD Graduates

2011/2012 Budget Reductions for Consideration  
Central Office Budget Reductions as planned 2,762,032.00  
     
Energy Savings 592,568.00  
Mid-Day Kindergarten Transportation 127,400.00  
     
Reduce One Assistant Principal per High School               Rationale: Three Assistant Principals (or 2 and a Dean of Students) aligns with most high schools of similar size in our area. 542,388.00  
Middle School In-School Suspension 173,527.00  
Principal’s Travel Fund Carryover 248,951.00  
10 Furlough Days for Superintendent and Chiefs               Rationale: As KSD Certificated Staff are paid less than those in 22 surrounding districts, it is reasonable to reduce pay for administrators to a similar level. Furlough days can be taken in the summer without impact to the student school year. 76,020.00  
10 Furlough Days for District Management                        Rationale:  See above 323,560.00  
Return 11 TOSAs/Coaches/Facilitators to the classroom. Rationale: The professionals working in the trenches will agree that teachers in the classroom keeping class size low and programs intact will prove to be of the most value in student achievement. These staff can fill open positions in the schools. (Estimated savings based on the average cost per certificated staff of $80,963, although potential savings could be higher as most staff in these positions are typically higher paid staff). 890,593.00  
Cut “Travel” from the Budget                                                Rationale:  Priorities. Elementary PE and Music should be valued over administrator travel. 330,000.00  
Total Reduction 6,067,039.00  

Education Reform?

February 22, 2011

There are a lot of people out there talking education reform these days and it’s getting hard to keep the stories straight without a program and a script, but it’s good to know that there are some who are managing to see through all the fog (and smoke and mirrors that are trying to hide other agendas).  Here’s an article that can help you see past the people who would destroy public education by not funding it and then complain because it doesn’t seem to be working.  This article references Parents Across America (http://parentsacrossamerica.org/), a new organization that promises to connect parents and activists from across the U.S. to share ideas and work together on improving our nation’s public schools.  Please take a look and see if you agree with this article.

http://seattleducation2010.wordpress.com/2011/02/04/why-i-am-not-a-defender-of-the-status-quo-in-education-because-the-status-quo-is-failed-ed-reforms/

Solidarity with Wisconsin

February 22, 2011

With the situation in Wisconsin continuing, we urge you to sign the online petition that Mary Lindquist, WEA President has sent out to all members.  Much as you may not think so, this is your fight, too.  Saying, “It can’t happen here,” is not going to protect you from the union-busters that are here in our own state.  Make your voice heard along with millions of other union members nationwide.  I am reprinting Mary’s message here (you may have to copy and paste the links into your browser):

Colleagues,
I know many of you are following the developments in Wisconsin. Let’s send our suppport of fellow teachers, nurses, firefighters and all public employees of Wisconsin who are fighting for their rights.

Please sign the national petition to support public educators and workers’ rights. Let your voice be heard.

And encourage others to do the same. The online petition is at www.educationvotes.nea.org/nationalpetition.

In solidarity,
Mary Lindquist
WEA President

Message from Mary Lindquist

January 24, 2011

This is the text of a letter that WEA President Mary Lindquist sent out this past week.  The implications of any bill that radically changes the layoff procedures, transfer policies and/or seniority regulations should be considered very carefully.  Unfortunately, there are voices that are influencing the legislature that are speaking without the benefit of being in the classroom; of actually being a teacher and knowing the challenges facing us today.  The voices calling for removal of “bad teachers” are being heard loudly and must be countered.  The other side of the story must be told.  Your voice can be heard by writing to our legislators.  Go to http://www.ourvoicewashingtonea.org/ and tell them your story.  Here’s what Mary had to say:

“Sometime next week, it’s likely that legislators in Olympia will introduce a bill that if passed, would change teacher layoff procedures and transfer policies in ways that are detrimental to both educators and our students. Rather than wait until the bill is released and let you hear about it in the media or on Facebook, I wanted to tell you first. WEA leaders and lobbyists are monitoring things, and we will keep you informed as the issue develops. Here’s some of what we’re going to say if and when this bill is released:

• No one wants bad teachers in the classroom. That’s why school districts are implementing new evaluation systems that help identify and support the best teachers and weed out the ineffective ones. Let’s give it a chance to work before we impose yet another new mandate on local schools. The new research-based evaluation system is a balance of state and local input, it’s fair and it’s based on what works in the classroom.

• The proposed legislation apparently does nothing to prevent more teacher layoffs and budget cuts, which are the biggest problems our schools face. We are 48th in the country in class size, and we’re laying off teachers and support professionals when enrollment is going up. We don’t defend bad teachers, but our kids are trying to learn in overcrowded classrooms without the support they need.

• WEA members have been leaders in the education reform process, and we were proud to play a major role in the new evaluation law that passed last year. Our members know the classroom better than anyone else. We support research-based solutions that are proven to help students, and we’re working hard to protect education funding.

• Teachers, support professionals, legislators and parents must work together locally and in Olympia to ensure our children get the best possible education. They need reasonable class sizes now, and they can’t wait until the recession ends.

Visit the WEA website for regular news updates about action in Olympia, and for legislative advocacy tools, visit OurVoice.”

Education Roundtable

December 15, 2010

On November 30, the PTAs from Auburn and Kent held an Education Roundtable discussion with all of our local state Representatives and Senator.  The meeting was held at the KSD Boardroom and in attendance were Pat Sullivan, incumbent 47th District Representative, Mark Hargrove, new 47th District Representative, Cathy Dahlquist, new 31st District (Enumclaw/Auburn) Representative, and Joe Fain, new 47th District Senator.  Interested groups in attendance were:  Kent Area Council of PTAs, Auburn Council of PTAs, Auburn School Board, League of Education Voters, Stand For Children, WSPTA Region 9, Kent School Board, Auburn Education Association, Kent Education Association, Enumclaw School District and Board, Communities in Schools of Auburn and the Auburn Association of School Principals.  Each group developed one question that was asked of each politician and answers were given in a predetermined rotational order.  The meeting was an opportunity to hear all four of our local politicians speak on education issues.  I took a lot of notes and my intention was to post those here, but in the interim, I was given a copy of a set of notes taken by another teacher, this one from Auburn and in my humble opinion, a better note taker than me.  I compared both of our notes and his were a bit more complete and understandable so I asked for and received permission to reprint them here.  Understand, please, that these are notes taken at a relatively fast moving meeting and are, by design, a bit sketchy, as notes will be.  They are understandable, though, and I present them to you with very little editing to preserve the original form and intent.  They do provide a very complete picture of the  meeting that night and you should be able to figure out what was going on.  One note:  The complete text of each question is only replicated for Pat Sullivan as his responses are listed first.  In the interests of space, the rest only have a shortened version.  Please read on…

Pat Sullivan

1.  (from Kent Area Council of PTAs)  Approximately 30% of Washington’s students drop out before completing high school.  The socioeconomic and ethnic minority achievement gap remains persistent.  Our big businesses like Microsoft hire most of their employees from other states and countries, because our kids just don’t measure up.   What is your number one goal for educational reform for which we can hold you accountable?

  • Premise of question regarding Microsoft hiring is not true. 
  • We do need more science and math majors. 
  • Achievement gap is growing

 2.    (Auburn Council of PTAs) We fund Enumclaw classrooms $6k less than our Washington State average.  Kent classrooms are $14k less and Auburn classrooms are $17k less than State average.  And yet we’re raising our wealthier districts’ Levy Lids and cutting our poor districts’ LEA funding.  Do our South County kids deserve less State funding than our more prosperous neighbors’ kids?  What can we do about it?

  • A new salary workgroup is forming/meeting to address equalizing the state salary schedule

 3.  (Auburn School District Board of Directors)  With the Erlich decision that Basic Education Funding is not adequate or ample, and is a paramount duty of the state to do so, how will you approach your constitutional duty in the context of the fiscal crisis?

  • We need to stop calling things “not basic education”
  • I-728 was cut two years ago because it’s funding was not protected
  • I will work to protect education funding

 4.  (League of Education Voters) Washington State ranked 32 out of the 36 RTTT applications.  Should we work harder, smarter to improve education, or give up because there is no more money?  How do we keep Education reform moving forward?

  • I was “disgusted” with how the RTTT applications were evaluated
  • WA lost points because we didn’t have “charter schools” even though we have many innovative things going on in the state

 5.  (Stand for Children) With continued budget deficits, future teacher layoffs are a looming reality.  Currently in Washington State, decisions about which teachers to layoff are based only on seniority.  This means great teachers are let go, more teachers are let go and class sizes grow.  Will you support legislation that ensures reduction in force focus on performance, not solely on seniority?

  • We need more teachers – and we need to address the lack of minority teachers

 6.  (WSPTA Region 9) With our demographic and financial challenges, how can our South County children compete more successfully with their peers across Washington State, the U.S., and Internationally?

  • We have a growing area with many languages spoken
  • Changing standards and tests hurts progress

 7.   (Kent School District Board of Directors) Would you support a requirement that all legislation mandating K-12 programs or services provide full funding for all costs, including incidental, administrative, non-employee, and other related program or services costs?  Additionally, if adequate funding is not provided to school districts to comply with currently mandated programs or services, would you support eliminating those mandates until such funding becomes available?

  • Yes, but tough.

 8.  (Auburn Education Association) According to our state constitution, it is the paramount duty to provide full and ample funding for the public education of all children.  What are your plans to introduce legislation that provides a reliable, on-going, dedicated source of revenue to fully fund education in the state of Washington?

  • Cuts will be outside of basic education
  • Initiatives are a possible way to raise revenue
  • Push has to come from the business community
  • We need a coalition

 9.  (Kent Education Association)  The budget forecast is dismal, what will you do to ensure that the constitutional duty to fully fund schools is upheld so that further cuts do not impact student learning?

  • I will fight for full funding of education
  • Need to get more funding dedicated to basic education

 10.  (Enumclaw School District Superintendent and Board)  As a district, what advice would you give us in terms of process and strategy that would help truly impact state legislative decisions regarding educational issues (i.e. adequate funding, unfunded mandates)?

  • Getting to know your legislators is critical

 11.  (Communities in Schools  of Auburn)  The drop-out rate in our state has been consistent for a long time at between 25-30% by the end of high school, resulting in a tremendous negative impact on our state’s economy.  Shouldn’t reducing the dropout rate be a top priority for the state’s legislature?  Do you think we should use proven organizations like CIS to improve graduation rates?  Should it be part of basic education funding?

  • Yes, mentors are very important
  • Touts drop-out early-warning program

 12.  (Association of Auburn School Principals)  Last week, Governor Gregoire called for a retroactive $81 million cut to public schools for K-4 class size reduction, as well as retroactive cuts of $18 million in levy equalization dollars going to property-poor school districts.  She also proposed delaying a K-12 apportionment payment until July.  What will you specifically do to help resolve the state’s budget crisis while ensuring that Washington’s children receive the financial support they need?  (Editor’s note:  Mr. Sullivan’s comments for this question were missed.  We apologize.)

Joe Fain

1.  What is your number one goal for educational reform, for which we can hold you accountable?

  • Bipartisanship in the Senate is going to be important

 2.  Do our South County kids deserve less State funding than our more prosperous neighbors’ kids?  What can we do about it?

  • A serious problem that some districts get more money than others.

 3.  With the Erlich decision that Basic Education Funding is not adequate or ample, and is a paramount duty of the state to do so, how will you approach your constitutional duty in the context of the fiscal crisis?

  • Constituents need to be loud in communicating priorities

 4.   How do we keep Education reform moving forward?

  • Performance pay [acknowledges this is controversial]
  • Anti-seniority
  • “Some teachers are in the wrong line of work”
  • There are problems with the hiring and layoff policies
  • We didn’t do enough to win award of RTTT

 5.  Will you support legislation that ensures reduction in force focus on performance, not solely on seniority?

  • “Time in the chair” should not guarantee a job

 6.  With our demographic and financial challenges, how can our South County children compete more successfully with their peers across Washington State, the U.S., and Internationally?

  • Current tools are not sufficient to deal with current situation
  • Streamline education records of student progress for kids who move from district to district

 7.   Would you support a requirement that all legislation mandating K-12 programs of services provide full funding for all costs, including incidental, administrative, non-employee, and other related program or services costs?  Additionally, if adequate funding is not provided to school districts to comply with currently mandated programs or services, would you support eliminating those mandates until such funding becomes available?

  • Yes, Streamline federal and state reporting forms
  • Suspend some requirements

 8.  What are your plans to introduce legislation that provides a reliable, on-going, dedicated source of revenue to fully fund education in the state of Washington?

  • ”Take me to school” to teach me how to do this.

 9.   (KEA)  The budget forecast is dismal, what will you do to ensure that the constitutional duty to fully fund schools is upheld so that further cuts do not impact student learning?

  • I have my vote.
  • I will not vote for a budget that makes draconian cuts to education

 10.  (Enumclaw SD Superintendent and Board)  As a district, what advice would you give us in terms of process and strategy that would help truly impact state legislative decisions regarding educational issues?

  • Persistence
  • Networking

 11.  (Communities in Schools  of Auburn)  Do you think we should use proven organizations like CIS to improve graduation rates?  Should it be part of basic education funding?

  • Yes, and yes.
  • We need more public/private links

 12.  (Association of Auburn School Principals)  What will you specifically do to help resolve the state’s budget crisis while ensuring that Washington’s children receive the financial support they need?

  • “I don’t know”

 

Cathy Dahlquist

1.  What is your number one goal for educational reform, for which we can hold you accountable?

  • Agrees with Sullivan that premise of question is untrue with reference to Microsoft hiring
  • Unfunded mandates are a concern

 2.  Do our South County kids deserve less State funding than our more prosperous neighbors’ kids?  What can we do about it?

  • Levy lid lift was unfair

 3.  With the Erlich decision that Basic Education Funding is not adequate or ample, and is a paramount duty of the state to do so, how will you approach your constitutional duty in the context of the fiscal crisis?

  • Expand definition of “basic ed”

 4.  How do we keep Education reform moving forward?

  • Evaluations need to mean something
  • We need to develop better evaluations
  • Parent choice [aka:  school choice]
  • “Choice” schools need to meet same requirements as public schools

 5.  Will you support legislation that ensures reduction in force focus on performance, not solely on seniority?

  • Supports performance-based evaluations – details are important
  • Enumclaw contract was tougher to negotiate because of Kent settlement – districts are competing for teachers
  • In questions from the audience, she was asked how the Kent settlement made Enumclaw’s negotiations tougher.  Her response was that KEA had negotiated a “really big raise” and that Enumclaw has to compete for teachers with competitive salary.

 6.   With our demographic and financial challenges, how can our South County children compete more successfully with their peers across Washington State, the U.S., and Internationally?

  • [mix up on questions – answered another, unrelated question]

 7.  Would you support a requirement that all legislation mandating K-12 programs of services provide full funding for all costs, including incidental, administrative, non-employee, and other related program or services costs?  Additionally, if adequate funding is not provided to school districts to comply with currently mandated programs or services, would you support eliminating those mandates until such funding becomes available?

  • Yes, and yes.

 8.  What are your plans to introduce legislation that provides a reliable, on-going, dedicated source of revenue to fully fund education in the state of Washington?

  • We already have revenue
  • Fund education first, then cut from everything else to balance the budget

 9.   (KEA)  the budget forecast is dismal, what will you do to ensure that the constitutional duty to fully fund schools is upheld so that further cuts do not impact student learning?

  • “Ditto, ditto” to Sullivan’s comments
  • Business puts people into office
  • We need to get business community to put more efforts into education

 10.  (Enumclaw SD Superintendent and Board)  As a district, what advice would you give us in terms of process and strategy that would help truly impact state legislative decisions regarding educational issues?

  • Email, call
  • I won’t look at 500 emails that all the same
  • Write individual comments/emails

 11.  (Communities in Schools  of Auburn)  Do you think we should use proven organizations like CIS to improve graduation rates?  Should it be part of basic education funding?

  • Not familiar with CIS, so I looked it up online
  • Has no experience with organization

 12.  (Association of Auburn School Principals)  What will you specifically do to help resolve the state’s budget crisis while ensuring that Washington’s children receive the financial support they need?

  • “Heels are dug in” for education funding

 

Mark Hargrove

1.   (Kent Are Council of PTAs)  What is your number one goal for educational reform, for which we can hold you accountable?

  • The word “accountability” is intimidating
  • Pro-“Innovation schools” [not to be confused with charter schools]
  • Speaks against seniority
  • Pro performance-pay [new term for “merit pay”?]
  • Schools/teachers need to be given “latitude” with regards to curriculum

 2.  (Auburn Council of PTAs)  Do our South County kids deserve less State funding than our more prosperous neighbors’ kids?  What can we do about it?

  • Need to reevaluate funding to be sure money is appropriated well
  • Makes an “Almost Live” reference to how they used to talk about Kent as a hick, redneck town, but now it’s a very culturally diverse city

 3.  (Auburn School Board of Directors)  With the Erlich decision that Basic Education Funding is not adequate or ample, and is a paramount duty of the state to do so, how will you approach your constitutional duty in the context of the fiscal crisis?

  • Need to be more efficient with how money is spent
  • “I’ve got some ideas”

 4.   (League of Education Voters)  How do we keep Education reform moving forward?

  • Teachers need more freedom
  • More accountability
  • Merit pay
  • Principals at buildings can best decide who the best teachers are

 5.  (Stand for Children)  Will you support legislation that ensures reduction in force focus on performance, not solely on seniority?

  • Founding member of the Instructional Pilots Union at Boeing
  • Supports RIF based on performance

 6.  (WSPTA Region 9)  With our demographic and financial challenges, how can our South County children compete more successfully with their peers across Washington State, the U.S., and Internationally?

  • We need more motivating principals so teachers aren’t dragging into work each day unhappy or unmotivated

 7.   Would you support a requirement that all legislation mandating K-12 programs of services provide full funding for all costs, including incidental, administrative, non-employee, and other related program or services costs?  Additionally, if adequate funding is not provided to school districts to comply with currently mandated programs or services, would you support eliminating those mandates until such funding becomes available?

  • There is a division between funding and mandates
  • Yes

 8.  What are your plans to introduce legislation that provides a reliable, on-going, dedicated source of revenue to fully fund education in the state of Washington?

  • We need stable sources of funding
  • Helping small business will help keep funding stability

 9.   (KEA)  The budget forecast is dismal, what will you do to ensure that the constitutional duty to fully fund schools is upheld so that further cuts do not impact student learning?

  • The key phrase is “impact student learning”
  • Things can be cut that don’t impact student learning
  • “I’ve got some ideas”

 10.  (Enumclaw SD Superintendent and Board)  As a district, what advice would you give us in terms of process and strategy that would help truly impact state legislative decisions regarding educational issues?

  • Inform him with facts as to how suggestions will improve education
  • Wants facts and data
  • Wants ideas that have no cost

 11.  (Communities in Schools  of Auburn)  Do you think we should use proven organizations like CIS to improve graduation rates?  Should it be part of basic education funding?

  • Show me facts/data that it works

 12.  (Association of Auburn School Principals)  What will you specifically do to help resolve the state’s budget crisis while ensuring that Washington’s children receive the financial support they need?

  • Problem in WA state is spending
  • Small business pays more in taxes to the state
  • I am a strict constitutionalist
  • One way to save money is to combine printing orders and privatize printing
  • Refers to the “student product”

What Does The KSD Priority Analysis Tell Us?

June 25, 2010

Once again, here are some important points from the June 2 Community Budget Forum regarding the KSD budget and its comparison to other districts in the area:

  • Only one of KSD’s neighboring King County districts had a larger percentage difference between budgeted and actual spending.
  • The 2008-9 difference between Kent’s budgeted and actual spending amounted to more than $14.2 million.  That’s  the largest dollar difference amoung neighboring districts….by far!
  • KSD is near the midpoint in revenue per pupil, but KSD still manages to have a much larger fund balance (aka “Rainy Day” fund) than any other district in the group.
  • KSD’s ending fund balance asa  percentage of total actual spending at the end of last year was the highest among neighboring districts.
  • That same amount also equates to more money in the bank per pupil than any of the other districts.
  • KSD spends less per pupil on instructional activities than all but two of the neighboring districts, and only one of the neighboring districts spends less as a percentage of total spending on instructional activities.

You can view the entire Community Budget Forum presentation from June 2nd here.  We welcome your comments and questions!